Monterrey, México, August 12, 2009

In the morning, B.O. took me to 24 Horas, where we had fruit smoothies for breakfast. I chose one named Murcielago (“bat”), which was a dark red color. Here’s a photo of our drinks; my Murcielago is on the right.

Fruit Smoothie Breakfast at 24 Horas

Fruit Smoothie Breakfast at 24 Horas

Here’s a colorful photo that I took of the menu. Above the post for Carolina, you can see the ingredients for the Murcielago: oranges, beets, and celery. I’m not sure what the numbers “20-28-36” under the ingredients mean. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium? (Just kidding.)

A Few Items on the 24 Horas Menu

A Few Items on the 24 Horas Menu

Afterward breakfast, we stopped by the Laboratorios Moreira, a private laboratory where B.O. had some routine bloodwork done for her annual medical check-up. Within hours, she was able to check the results via the internet, something that I am unable to do in the U.S. I believe that people can’t check laboratory results in the U.S. in general, possibly because HIPAA requirements may make it infeasible. California may be an exception; in 2001, bill AB 1490 was signed into law (see page 20).

Next, we visited B.O.’s friend N.V., to plan for her wedding and reception on August 15. Then we went to Divisas San Jorge Casa de Cambio, where I changed some dollars to pesos, and then went to B.O.’s office, Principal Financial. Here’s B.O. at her office:

B.O. At Her Office, 2006

B.O. At Her Office, 2006

Then we made a stop at Home Depot to buy blinds for B.O.’s room. The Home Depot felt like any Home Depot that I’ve been to in the U.S., except that all the signage was in Spanish.

In the parking lot of the Home Depot

In the parking lot of the Home Depot

Afterwards, we visited B.O.’s sister A. to ask her husband A. to install the new blinds. B.O.’s father E. joined us after several minutes. Then B.O. and I went to Carl Jr.’s to have burgers (yes, not very Méxican) for lunch. The Carl Jr.’s was crowded because people were watching the U.S. vs. México soccer game on the TV there. México won, 2-1.

Then we went to the nearby Gandhi Bookstore, but as we were just about to enter the store I realized that I had forgotten my mochilla (backpack) at Carl Jr.’s. Since it was so close, it was easiest for me to simply walk back to the Carl Jr.’s to retrieve it.

Backpack Retrieved

Backpack Retrieved

I bought several books, mostly having to do with Mexican culture and history.

At the end of the day, we had dinner at the house of one of B.O.’s other sisters, D., whose husband J.R. served up grilled vegetables (onions, peppers, and nopales) and meats (beef and sausage). Here is the official Mexican site for the nopal and its fruit, tuna, which are considered very healthful foods.

Here are some photos of the food as it was being grilled.

Dinner on the Mesquite Charcoal Grill

Dinner on the Mesquite Charcoal Grill

Close-Up of Vegetales

Close-Up of Vegetales


Trip Summary

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Korean Sausage (Soondae)

This past Wednesday night I bought dinner at the Lotte on Wisteria Drive, in Germantown. My habit is to get a meat dish, usually “Spiced Pork,” and bibimbap, for the vegetables.

For some reason, I was feeling daring that night. Instead of the Spiced Pork, I thought I’d try the “Korean Style Sausage.” It looked exactly like this, and came with a sort of seasoned salt, as well as a dipping sauce that had what looked like little shrimp floating in it. The sausage wasn’t bad, although I think using both the seasoned salt and the dipping sauce made it a little too salty.

The next day, out of curiousity, I Googled “Korean Sausage,” and found out exactly what was in soondae. I then found myself curiously less enthusiastic about eating it! My thought chain started darting from peristaltic waves of ropes of intestines, to chyme, to the Crypts of Lieberkühn, and then it was all over. I had lost my appetite.

YouTube video of jejunal peristaltic waves

It’s funny how cognition can color the sense of taste. Almost like synesthesia (okay, not quite).

I surrendered and tossed the remaining sausage. Then I went back to Lotte and bought spiced pork to go with the remaining bibimbap.

It’s true what they say about sausage: you don’t want to know how it’s made.

Published in: on 10 January 2009 at 8:41 am  Leave a Comment  
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