Obtain a Paper Electronically from Dahlgren Memorial Library

Let’s say you wanted to obtain a copy of this (infamous) paper.

  1. Go to the Dahlgren Memorial Library web page.

  2. Click on the link “Journal Finder”.

  3. Type “Nature” into the search box.

  4. Since “Nature” is a common word in journal titles, you’ll get too many hits if you do an unconstrained search. So, change the selection box “Partial Words” to “Exact Phrase”.

  5. Click on the “Search” button.

  6. Under “Full Text Access”, click any of the little icons that look like a check mark. I’d say go to the one corresponding to “Publisher”. This should bring you to the website of the publisher of the journal Nature.

  7. Go to the link labeled “Archive” and look for the article there.
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Published in: on 11 September 2009 at 6:14 am  Leave a Comment  

PubMed Search

Let’s say you wanted to a PubMed search for articles about “transcendental medicine”. To search for articles in which this term occurs in the title, do this PubMed search:

     transcendental medicine [ti]

Hmm, no articles were found at the time I did this search. Maybe search for this term in either the title or the abstract:

     transcendental medicine [tiab]

Still nothing. Maybe there are no articles published on PubMed on this topic.


Or suppose you wanted to search for papers by author J. Smith. You could do the following search:

     smith j [au]

Since there are many authors whose first name began with “J” and whose last name was “Smith”, there are many hits. To restrict the list to only those papers where J. Smith was the first author, use the [1au] tag instead:

     smith j [1au]

There are still many hits. To further restrict the search to first author J. Smiths from Georgetown University, try this search:

     smith j [1au] AND georgetown [ad]

which demonstrates a boolean expression. To search for first author J. Smiths from either Georgetown University or Yale University, try this search:

     smith j [1au] AND ( georgetown [ad] OR yale [ad] )

which demonstrates the boolean OR and the use of parentheses. Boolean NOT also works, but I don’t use it so often.


Here are the search tags that I use most frequently, roughly ordered from most- to least-frequently used.

Tag Function
au Author
1au First Author
ti in Title
tiab in Title or Abstract
ta in Journal; you can use the officially recognized abbreviations, e.g. you can use either “Human Brain Mapping” or “hum brain mapp”
dp Date of Publication; e.g.

    2009 [dp]

for papers published in 2009, or

    2009/2 [dp]

for papers published in February, 2009

vi in Volume (I remember this because of the vi text editor)
ip in Issue (I remember this because of IP addresses)
pg in Page


Searching PubMed

Published in: on 11 September 2009 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

JSTOR Search

  1. Go to Lauinger Library’s website, and click on the link labeled Articles and Databases; then click on the JSTOR link.

  2. On JSTOR, do a search for “transcendental medicine” (yes, including the double quotes). This should yield about a dozen hits.

  3. Right-click on the title of one of the articles, e.g. right-click on the word “Wonders” (article #6 in my search results). Select “Open Link in New Tab”. (Depending on your browser, you might not be able to do this, in which case you might have to open in a new window, or even just single-click on the link.)

  4. In the new tab, click on the link labeled “View list of pages with search term(s)”. This should make a list of pages in which “transcendental medicine” occurred; click on one of these pages. In the “Wonders” article, only one page (page 25) has the words “transcendental medicine”.

  5. JSTOR should show you the page where “transcendental medicine” occurred, and it should highlight the search words in yellow. In the “Wonders” article, we catch only the last half of the sentence; to see the first half of the sentence, click on the gold-colored bar to the left of the page to go back one page.

  6. If you’re interested in the article, single-click on the link labeled PDF.

  7. If you repeat the above steps for several articles and look at the sentences in which “trancendental medicine” occurred, you’ll see evidence that “transcendental medicine” had something to do with a mystical movement, and with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Earlier post on JSTOR.

Published in: on 11 September 2009 at 5:01 am  Comments (1)  

Monterrey, México, August 17, 2009

In the morning, I split a sandwich (pavo y queso, if I remember correctly) at Starbucks with B.O. Then we visited the mountain-top Sanctuario of Schoenstatt. The road to the top of the mountain gradually became rougher and rougher, eventually becoming a gravel road, and then becoming a dirt road.

Here is a nice photo that B.O. took last year (26 May 2009) of the chapel. It looks like a scene out of a fairy tale.

Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt

Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt

B.O. suggested I go over the crest of the mountain. On the city-side of the mountain, you could hear the city noise. But on the opposite side of the mountain where the chapel sits, it is quiet; peaceful; meditative.

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (I)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (I)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (II)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (II)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (III)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (III)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (IV)

Mountain-Top View from the Sanctuario (IV)

Vegetation at the Sanctuario (I)

Vegetation at the Sanctuario (I)

Vegetation at the Sanctuario (II)

Vegetation at the Sanctuario (II)

Me at the Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt

Me at the Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt

Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt (interior)

Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt (interior)

B.O. and Me at the Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt

B.O. and Me at the Chapel of the Sanctuario de Schoenstatt


Then B.O. took me to the airport, and I returned to D.C.

Published in: on 1 September 2009 at 6:15 am  Comments (7)  
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